The Collegian
Tuesday, November 29, 2022

Features


Features

Rainbow Station looking to hire Richmond graduates

Rainbow Station, a Henrico-based company, is looking to hire University of Richmond graduates to fill teaching positions in China as part of its international expansion. After opening its first preschool in Shenzhen, China last January, the company plans to establish 110 educational facilities in China over the next five years. According to the Richmond Times-Dispatch, Rainbow Station will provide small classes that feature a curriculum based around teaching Franklin Covey's "The Leader in Me" program for children. The company operates four locations in the Richmond area at Wyndham, Three Chopt, The Boulders and Hanover Medical Park. "We are interested in recent college graduates who have teaching experience or an interest in early education to go on a great adventure in China for a few years," said Rick Sample, Rainbow Station International president, "and that's why we are interested in UR and schools nearby." According to Rainbow Station's website, its vision is to be the standard of excellence in early education, school-age recreation and mildly ill care.


Features

Richmond hosts discussion on spirituality and sexuality

The offices of Common Ground, Counseling and Psychological Services and the Chaplaincy sponsored a discussion called "Sexuality & Spirituality: Student Stories of Faith & Struggle" March 31 in Adams Auditorium. A panel of four students from various Christian traditions shared personal experiences about the differing relationships between their religious beliefs and human sexuality.


Features

Richmond remembers Rwanda, raises concern for human rights

Robert Agaba, who will graduate from University of Richmond this May with a degree in international studies, describes himself as a "gregarious, talkative guy." Other students have said they enjoyed his endearing stories about his wife and 7-month-old daughter. But underneath Agaba's cheerful outlook are personal memories of a genocide that shook the world just two decades ago.


Features

Senior Octaves showcase their roles at Spring Fever

He doesn't always star in promotional videos for the Octaves' Spring Fever a cappella concert, but when he does, senior Bennie DeSalvo is dubbed by his fellow group members as the most interesting Octave in the world. In honor of the 20th anniversary of Spring Fever on March 28, the Octaves titled their concert "Dos Equis," and opened their set with a video of their search for a high-caliber addition to the group. The characters in the video found that addition in DeSalvo, but his impact on the Octaves ranged beyond a video made in jest. "Bennie is a leader on stage," Oliver Lee, sophomore Octave, said.


Features

UR Hungry: Mama J's Kitchen

Mama J's Kitchen is a small, soul food restaurant in downtown Richmond. There is always a wait and all of the reviews rave about the amazing food and that the best way to have everything is fried. One of my friends was visiting from Michigan for the weekend, and I wanted to show her an authentic soul food restaurant, so Mama J's was an obvious choice.


Features

SEEDS travels to Louisiana and West Virginia Spring Break 2014

The Students Engaging and Enacting a Dialogue on Service Project is a student-run organization at University of Richmond that works with marginalized communities to examine the complexities of American society in order to encourage a deeper understanding of the role of service both locally and nationally, according to its website. Each year, the SEEDS Project makes two service trips during Spring Break.


Features

Art show raises money for World Pediatric Project

The Bon Air Artists Association collaborated with and supported the cause of the World Pediatric Project in the Artful Healing show at the Jepson Alumni Center on March 23. Joyce Satterwhite, a member of the Bon Air Artists Association, said about a thousand people attended, counting those who came to the reception the night before and those who came to the event Sunday, which was open to the public. "It went very well," Satterwhite said.