The Collegian
Wednesday, October 05, 2022

Features


Features

Gossip Web site JuicyCampus.com sparks controversy

"Always anonymous. Always juicy," is the self-proclaimed description of the Web site JuicyCampus.com, which allows students at 50 colleges and universities to post anonymous comments about other students and organizations at their schools. The Web site urges students to "give us the juice," which has often resulted in racist, sexist, homophobic and offensive posts. The University of Richmond is not currently listed as one of the supported campuses, but anyone can look at the Web site.


Features

A Day in the Life of: A Parking Enforcer

It's been a long day. The last thing you want to do is walk from X-lot to North Court, in the pouring rain, with a broken leg, carrying those boxes for a friend - so you decide to drive. "The car won't be parked there for more than 10 minutes," you tell yourself.


Features

Have you heard?

Freshman year, Katie Murray lost her voice. Bronchitis couldn't have come at a worse time - it was the week of a cappella auditions and Murray, now a junior, was on a mission. "From the moment I saw the a cappella concert at orientation freshman year, I was hooked," she said. She missed auditions that fall, but for the rest of the year she never missed an a cappella concert.


Features

Students visit Peru to benefit public health

For the second consecutive year, Rick Mayes, associate professor of public policy, is taking students to Peru during Spring Break. This year, about 18 people are planning to go on the trip to Lima and Pampas Grande, including two University of Richmond students from Peru.


Features

AKA calls for Greeks to step it up

Thanks to Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc., University of Richmond students were given a little taste of stepping last weekend. AKA hosted its first "Step Into Our World" step show on Saturday Night at the Pier to promote cultural awareness and unity among different sororities and fraternities on campus.


Features

In-depth wedding planning part of SCS series

What flowers? What food? Who will sit where? What colors? And most importantly, which of the thousands of dresses will I wear? These are all questions that wedding planners help brides answer every day, and they are only a few of the considerations that feed into the at least $50 billion wedding industry.


Features

Charleston: Not too late for a last-minute spring break

If you're looking for a last minute spring break destination that's a drive away and more affordable than a week on a tropical beach, Charleston, S.C., might be the place to stay. Charleston, which fosters a blend of contemporary culture and a sense of historical pride, fulfills the label of a college town, offering an array of busy bars, chic stores, art galleries and impressive beaches. Daniel Jones, a travel agent at the AAA Mid-Atlantic Southside Richmond office, said Charleston is a popular destination nationwide, and is a well-known city internationally as well.


Features

Some students decry performance of Vagina Monologues

The cast and supporters of "The Vagina Monologues" expect a successful series of performances this weekend at the University of Richmond despite written dissent from the College Republicans. The Monologues, which is performed internationally around Valentine's Day to support V-Day, a global movement to stop violence against women and girls, opened Wednesday night and will be performed again at 9 p.m.


Features

Student interns observe political processes during eight weeks at General Assembly

Each week, 18 University of Richmond students wake up, put on black suit coats and close-toed shoes, sit in rush hour traffic and push through the revolving doors of the General Assembly Building. Instead of money, these juniors and seniors are earning six credits for the 20 hours per week that they spend working for the Virginia General Assembly through the university's oldest internship program, Political Science 395: State Legislative Internship. The course, which has been offered since the 1970s, is divided into two sections.


Features

Emotions run high during solemn holiday service

Absent were the celebratory Christmas carols, the brightly ringing bells, the jubilant and joyous greetings of a traditional Christmas service in Cannon Memorial Chapel. Absent were the cries of joy and happiness, replaced, instead, with cries from quiet sobs in an atmosphere of solemn reflection. And absent was the customary candle lighting for a somber rendition of "Silent Night." Instead, a procession of people stepped up, one-by-one, to light candles and say the name of loved ones whom they had lost. For those who attended Tuesday's nondenominational Blue Christmas Service at noon at the chapel, the holidays have been a struggle to find happiness while the rest of the world seems filled with joy. "This service is for you," Kate O'Dwyer Randall, the university's acting Chaplain, told the congregation of about 35 students and community members at the beginning of the service.


Features

Third Eye Blind gives intimate performance in Richmond

Third Eye Blind played a sold-out concert to more than 1,400 people at Toad's Place Monday night with music that spanned a decade, with hits from the '90s and unreleased songs from their next album. The band's 10-day tour includes shows at venues that are smaller than usual.


Features

For Abby Ayers, public life means keeping some things close to heart

Among the events the Ayerses attend each week, a contest that Abby and Ed Ayers participated in struck the new university president as a symbol of their experiences since they had lived in Richmond. They agreed to a local "Dancing with the Stars" competition, which they competed in against Bobby Ukrop and a local radio personality.


Basketball

Dedication to basketball shaped manager's life, influenced teams

During an Atlanta meet-and-greet for young alumni in October, former University of Richmond men's basketball team manager Daniel Woolley told new President Edward Ayers he was upset that Richmond had disbanded its sports management major. "He kind of bit his ear off," his mother, Charlsie Woolley said. Ayers asked Woolley if he would have majored in sports management.


Features

Jazz pioneer Pat Metheny to play at Modlin Center

On Nov. 9, sounds of contemporary jazz music will be captured within the walls of Camp Concert Hall as Pat Metheny combines his cutting edge style on the guitar with Christian McBride on bass and Antonio Sanchez on drums. "This is a once in a lifetime opportunity to see a guy who plays at gargantuan venues and huge universities with over 3,000 seats in an up close and personal setting," said Kathy Panoff, executive director of the Modlin Center for the Arts.