The Collegian
Friday, February 23, 2024

Features


Incumbent Rep. Eric Cantor, a Republican representing Virginia's 7th district, accepted his re-election Tuesday night at the Richmond Marriott Hotel West in downtown Richmond. (Duncan Phillips/The Collegian)
Features

Kappa wins 2013 Stepping 101 competition

The members of the Kappa Kappa Gamma step team walked away with the $500 prize Friday night at the annual STEPPING 101 competition after winning first place at Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity's event in the Alice Haynes Room. In the "That 70s Show" themed event, the five Panhellenic sororities competed against each other on stage.


Features

Professor Mufti gives talk about his new book

Nations, like people, build their place in the world by building their stories around themselves, journalism professor Shahan Mufti said last Wednesday during a talk about his new book in Boatwright Memorial Library. With about 30 seats open to the public, a mixed audience of faculty and students listened to Mufti speak about his book that is part of the Muslim Journey Bookshelf. In early 2013, the National Endowment for the Humanities Bridging Cultures Initiative and the American Library Association awarded the Muslim Journeys Bookshelf to the staff at the library and the Office of the Chaplaincy, said Olivia Reinauer, University of Richmond librarian. The grant provided books, online databases and publicity materials for programs focused on Islam.


Features

A review of Alison Stewart's "First Class"

If readers did not previously know the connection between the inventor of the blood bank, the first African-American Cabinet Member, the first black graduate of the Naval Academy and the first black Army General, then they might be interested in Alison Stewart's new book "First Class." Each of the aforementioned attended Dunbar High School in Washington, D.C., before moving on to their accomplishments.


Features

International pilgrimages allow students to explore faith

Traveling abroad is a common experience for University of Richmond students. But not everyone has the opportunity to explore his or her faith in an international setting. The Office of the Chaplaincy has organized pilgrimages to France, Poland and Morocco this year, Craig Kocher, the university chaplain, said.


Features

Temporary Lincoln exhibit lacks student visitors

A traveling historical exhibit at University of Richmond Downtown has not been as popular as its organizers had hoped, but the events surrounding it have thrived. The exhibit, "Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War," is a set of large panels that display information and photographs of original documents, such as Civil War-era letters and a draft of Lincoln's first inaugural speech.


Features

Student governments bringing food trucks to campus

Imagine coming out of the Gottwald Center for the Sciences after a long morning of studying for finals and heading to Heilman Dining Center for your standard exam snack of cold cereal--instead, when you step out of the building you are greeted by the smell of hamburgers, meatballs and empanadas. Richmond College Student Government Association and Westhampton College Government Association are working to make that scene a reality.


Features

Alpha Kappa Alpha spreads breast cancer awareness

"The worst thing you can probably think about as a college student is, 'When can I make time to do this paper?' and not being diagnosed with something as serious as breast cancer," said Jeanine Mowbray, president of University of Richmond's chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Inc. In 2008, a member of AKA received a diagnosis of breast cancer and survived. Monday night, Oct.


Features

Common Ground teaches LGBTQ history, culture during UR Comes Out

Throughout October, University of Richmond's Office of Common Ground has been busy hosting its annual UR Comes Out: a series of speakers, receptions and interactive workshops celebrating LGBTQ History Month on campus. October is recognized as LGBTQ History Month in the United States, said Ted Lewis, associate director of LGBTQ campus life.


Features

Jepson professor Thad Williamson teaches by example

While teaching courses such as Justice and Civil Society and Social Movements, Thad Williamson seeks new ways for his students to apply the ethical principles they discuss in class, so he challenges them to engage in the Richmond area and get hands-on experience in the realms of social action and change. But when Williamson, a leadership studies and philosophy, politics, economics and law (PPEL) professor, encouraged his students to involve themselves, his students deflected the challenge at him. "He came in with a cut nose and a black eye from an accident while playing on a homeless men's soccer team," said Kacie Lundy, a senior who took both of Williamson's classes mentioned above.