The Collegian
Sunday, January 17, 2021

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Film Fridays: Blood of Zeus

<p><em>Graphic by Carissa Gurgul</em></p>

Graphic by Carissa Gurgul

Editor’s Note: This review contains spoilers. The views and opinions expressed in this article do not reflect those of The Collegian.

With each new month, Netflix has been promoting its original content and providing its subscribers with excellent movies and series. The latest addition to its gala of great original shows and movies is “Blood of Zeus,” a Netflix original anime.

Now, most people don’t think twice about anime shows. Some people love watching them, while the idea of an adult anime may turn others off. I can say with certainty that “Blood of Zeus” is an anime film worth giving a chance.

After having success with other Netflix-produced anime shows such as “Castlevania,” a gritty depiction of Dracula set in the universe of the Castlevania video games, it would make sense that the streaming goliath would continue to pursue original anime content. “Blood of Zeus” is the most recent venture into original anime shows, and it does not disappoint.

Set in the world of Ancient Greek mythology, the show follows Heron, the main protagonist, as he ventures on a journey of self-discovery and is immersed in the millennium-long conflict of conspiring Gods and Goddesses. Even with eight 30-minute episodes, “Blood of Zeus” delivers a strong narrative full of twists and action sequences that will leave you more than impressed. The show tells a tale, albeit with some fictional and new elements mixed in, that combines aspects from across Greek mythology that portrays mythological figures, such as Zeus and Hera, as all-powerful beings with typical human flaws.

Now, I’ll refrain from dissecting anything that is a spoiler, but this show left me wowed. I hadn’t heard anything about it and didn’t have any idea what it was when my roommate invited me to start the series with him. Four hours of watching later, and I had found myself wanting more episodes. It’s rare for me to be so invested in a show that I’m left wanting after the final credits appear, but this new Netflix anime did precisely that.

The animation style combined gruesome yet awesome action sequences, which distinguishes it from other anime that I’ve dabbled in watching. “Blood of Zeus” is not a kid’s show by any means. It deals with adult themes, has some of the most brutal sequences I’ve seen in a show and is pretty easy to follow. There are no complicated backstories or outside lore that an initial viewer may be confused about. From opening to close, “Blood of Zeus” makes it clear who each character is and what their motivations are. 

I’ll admit that the show hooked me for several reasons, but the main drive that kept me watching was my obsession with Greek mythology as a kid. The myths and stories that I read always fascinated me, and it was great to see some of those legends and tales animated on screen. Even without understanding the complexities that made up the Greek pantheon, “Blood of Zeus” is a positively reviewed show that I can’t recommend enough. Even if you’re unsure about watching it, you can finish the first season pretty rapidly without wasting a ton of time. 

If that isn’t enough to draw your interest, the first season got a 100% critic score on Rotten Tomatoes, a rare sight to see on such a new series. “Blood of Zeus” is available on Netflix, and I hope you enjoy every second of it; I know I have. 

Contact features writer Quinn Humphrey at quinn.humphrey@richmond.edu.

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