The Collegian
Tuesday, November 30, 2021

1

Current active cases

79

Total cumulative cases

97.6%

Reporting students vaccinated

94.2%

Reporting faculty/staff vaccinated


Features


Features

The American Library Association's Banned Books Week

This week librarians Betty Dickie and Catherine Clements posted the most frequently challenged books of 2007 on signs in front of Boatwright Memorial Library to remind students that they should celebrate their freedom to read and to ensure that such freedoms are safegaurded by practicing their rights and voting in the coming election. The most frequently challenged book of 2007 was "And Tango Makes Three," by Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell. The 10 Most Frequently Challenged Authors of 2007: 1.


Features

Have you heard: Alex Gold

"Soul to Squeeze" -- Red Hot Chili Peppers "Only God Can Judge Me" -- Tupac Shakur "Changes" -- Tupac Shakur "The Love of My Life" -- The Roots "I Could Have Lied" -- Red Hot Chili Peppers "Seed 2.0" -- The Roots "Rolling Sly Stone" -- Red Hot Chili Peppers "Bottom of the Map" -- Young Jeezy "Atliens" -- Outkast "The Next Movement" -- The Roots Sophomore Alex Gold's passion for hip-hop music started about eight years ago when he first heard Tupac's Shakur's song "Changes." This song helped Gold through difficult times, he said, and he has made it his goal to help people by providing them with inspirational lyrics as Tupac had done for him. He started recording songs under the name Real1ty about two years ago and has between 21 and 25 songs out right now, he said. Earlier this week, Gold's music was released on the "Coast to Coast 50" mix tape.


Features

Sigma Chi brothers Hammer it Home

The Sigma Chi brothers at the University of Richmond are using a portion of their funds to construct a home in Richmond for Jarneshia, the single mother of Jaden, a 7-year-old boy with Autism. Sigma Chi brothers are encouraging students to join in the construction through a project that they collaboratively organized, "Hammer It Home." Although Sigma Chi's national philanthropy is the Huntsman Cancer Institute, the brothers at Richmond decided to get involved with this project when they received an outside donation and wanted to put it toward something worthwhile, Philanthropy Chairman Chris Genualdi, a senior, said. "Instead of putting the money toward lodge parties and booze we wanted to do something good," he said.


Led by Jackie Pfamatter (headset/mic), students and faculty burn carbs and dance to salsa music Zumba on Tuesday Sept 23rd at 12:00pm in the Fitness Center.
Features

Staff members motivated by weight-loss contest

For six seasons, Americans have tuned in to NBC's reality show "The Biggest Loser," a weight-loss competition whose winner receives $250,000. The show's sixth season, which is currently airing, documents the struggles and sweat of eight teams, each made up of two family members. But, when the new season began airing on Sept.


Features

A Day in the Life: A Pier Cashier

"Who's next?" she calls as you step up to the plate. "I'll have the turkey sandwich with BBQ Baked Lays, two strawberry yogurts, a veggie tray, a large Powerade and an oatmeal cup," you say as she punches the color-coded buttons, the balance rises, the Spidercard is swiped (twice) with a "How you doin' today?" punctuated by the one-handed wave of a paper bag, and before you can answer, she's off... "Did she get all that?" you wonder as you watch her glide through the aluminum galley.


Features

Cherryholmes gives crowd a 'foot-tapping' performance

By Elizabeth Hyman Collegian Reporter Try not to bounce your leg in time to the music at a Cherryholmes concert. The bluegrass band, made up of Jere and Sandy Cherryholmes and four of their children, Cia, B.J., Skip and Molly, performed to a packed Camp Concert Hall Sunday night. From the moment they began their opener, "Don't Believe," the title song from their coming album release on Sept.


Led by Jackie Pfamatter (headset/mic), students and faculty burn carbs and dance to salsa music Zumba on Tuesday Sept 23rd at 12:00pm in the Fitness Center.
Features

Staff members motivated by weight-loss contest

For six seasons, Americans have tuned in to NBC's reality show "The Biggest Loser," a weight-loss competition whose winner receives $250,000. The show's sixth season, which is currently airing, documents the struggles and sweat of eight teams, each made up of two family members. But, when the new season began airing on Sept.


Features

Have you heard? Jeannie Neaylon

If you ever walk by the second floor bathroom in Robins you may have already gotten the chance to hear the musical picks of sophomore Jeannie Neaylon. John Mayer -- "Free Fallin'" Girl Talk -- "Feed the Animals" Keke Palmer -- "Bottoms Up" Augustana -- "Sweet and Low" (acoustic) Old Crow Medicine Show -- "Wagon Wheel" Graham Colton -- "Cellphane Girl" Dave Matthews Band -- "Old Dirt Hill" The Weepies -- "Can't Go Back Now" Wyclef Jean -- "Slow Down" John Butler Trio -- "Better Than" Other than playing tunes while in the shower, Neaylon listens to her collection of music frequently, whether it be while she is lying in bed or doing homework.


Features

Messenger staff plans to improve quality and publish an extra edition

By Kaileigh Connolly Collegian Reporter The Messenger's new editor, senior Jenny Patchen, has returned to Richmond from abroad with new ideas to revamp the campus literary magazine. Instead of the traditional annual edition of the Messenger, the staff will produce two editions, one each semester. The Messenger has not had a strong presence on campus in the past, but Patchen said she and her staff hoped to change that.


Features

Have you heard: Dudley Versaci

Dudley Versaci's interests in music began during the fourth grade when he started listening to the songs of Aerosmith. From there, Versaci moved onto Nirvana during his pre-teen adolescence and has continued to develop his interests in music since.


Features

Video: Trailer to 'Home for the Hobo Days'

The trailer to University of Richmond senior Dan Shoemaker's documentary about the National Hobo Convention in Britt, Iowa. Trailer to "Home for the Hobo Days," by Dan Shoemaker from The Collegian on Vimeo


Features

ART 180 helps disadvantaged youth spark positive change

Ten years ago, Richmond native Marlene Paul noticed that although Richmond had several organizations to help disadvantaged youth, most of them were without art-related programs. Paul believed that artistic expression would promote positive change, so she decided to begin a nonprofit organization, now known as ART 180, to supplement Richmond's existing youth services with an art component, she said. Today, Paul's idea has grown into an organization offering underprivileged children the opportunity to choose from 10, 12-week-long after-school programs during which children can express themselves through everything from film and fashion to drumming and stained glass. Although ART 180's office is located downtown within Artspace Gallery, the free programs are run at different youth facilities such as The Salvation Army Boys & Girls Club, William Byrd Community House and Elkhardt Middle School. ART 180 Development Manager Amy Koch, who had been working for the organization for one year, said that the programs were run like classes where the children developed their skills each week and worked toward a final exhibition, performance or recital.


Aisan Beat Practice Wednesday @ 9:30 in Booker 101
From left to right: Sandhya Talluri '11, Serena Ding '11, (legs/jeans) Mike Meksouphy VCU '10, (front) Hilbert Billones '09, (seated) Putt Virasathienpornkul '12, (brown shirt) Sunny Mui '11, Lori Smith '09, (blue shirt) Huan Duong '11, (red pants) Mariya Sota '09, Jackie Lee '09, (pink) Claire Ligon '10.
Features

Students form dance group to celebrate Asian hip-hop music

By Kate Foss Collegian Reporter Dance groups are often formed to showcase a certain style of dance, but at the University of Richmond, a dance group was created to showcase a certain type of music. Asian Beat, a dance group on campus, was started by senior Jackie Lee and three of her friends in the spring of 2007. "The purpose of the group is to promote Asian hip-hop and pop artists," Lee said, "as well as Asian artists here in the states." Lee, who is of Korean descent, was born in the United States but attended elementary school in Korea.